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THE UNITED STATES NAVY

SENIOR ENLISTED ACADEMY

Three Part Communications Module 2.01a

July 2016

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Three Part Communications

Senior Enlisted Academy – Newport, RI

Communication is the process of people sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings with each other in

commonly understandable ways.

For Senior Enlisted Leaders, there are few tasks more important than communication.

When communicating up or down the Chain of Command, communicating with peers, or

communicating with others outside the organization, Senior Enlisted Leaders must be able to

express their ideas and feelings in a quick concise manner, understandable by all.

Whether writing a paper or giving a speech, there are many different ways to communicate your

message. Three Part Communications is one such technique and it is the basis for all written and

oral assignments at the Senior Enlisted Academy.

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Three Part Communications

Three Part Communications consists of an introduction, the main body, and a conclusion. The

Three Part Communications structure allows the communicator to package ideas and thoughts in

a way that is easily and quickly understood.

Part one of Three Part Communications is to tell them what you are going to tell them. This is

the introduction.

Part two of Three Part Communications is to tell them. This is the main body. It uses main

points and transition sentences to accomplish this.

Part three of Three Part Communications is to tell them what you told them. This is the

conclusion.

Introduction – Tell them what you are going to tell them.

The introduction is where you introduce the listener/reader to what you are speaking/writing

about. In other words, tell them what you are going to tell them. To accomplish this task, use an

attention getter, motivation statement, and an overview of the main points. This is not a long

drawn-out process and it should not exceed, in most cases, a paragraph in length.

The attention getter grabs the listener/reader’s attention. Use a startling fact, thought, or idea

that will make your audience sit-up and want to hear or read more. The point of the attention

getter is to remove any distracting thoughts the listener/reader is currently thinking about and to

focus on the subject you are about to communicate. The attention getter should be one or two

sentences.

The motivation statement is known as the what’s in it for me (WIIFM) statement; the me refers

to the listener or reader, NOT the speaker or author. Use the WIIFM statement to motivate the

intended audience to want to listen to or read the message you are trying to communicate by

showing how your presentation benefits them. To keep their attention throughout, you must

convince them that the presentation will help satisfy their personal or job-related needs.

Your motivation should answer three Ws: Who? What? and Why? When you develop your

motivation use this method. Who is your audience. What is the topic you are going to discuss.

Why should the audience continue to read or listen? The why is often preceded by the word

“because” or “in order to” or “so that.” For example, “Senior Enlisted Academy students (who)

should understand three part communications (what) because it is the format used for their

assignments (why).” The motivation should only be one sentence.

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The overview covers the main points of the paper. A clear overview can contribute greatly to

the communication process by removing doubt in the minds of the listeners/readers about where

the presentation is going and how it is going to get there. Highlight only what the main points

are, do not cover information or details about the main points, save that information for the body.

The overview should only be one sentence.

Main Body – Tell them.

The main body of the paper is where you provide the meat and potatoes of the overall topic.

This is where you tell them using detailed main points. The main points should support the

overall topic of the speech/paper and be organized logically, sequentially, or chronologically.

The total number of main points is up to you, but if you have a main point, there must be enough

information to explain the main point fully. Too many main points make the presentation too

long or do not cover the individual main points in enough detail. Too few main points lead to

not enough details to support the overall topic. *** At the Senior Enlisted Academy, the main

points are already assigned for your written and oral assignments. ***

Transition sentences are at the end of each main point. Transitions signal to the listener/reader

that the communicator is progressing from the current main point to the next main point. They

are important in maintaining the continuity of the information being communicated. It is

important to remember to close out one main point and then introduce the next main point in the

transition. Ensure you use the main point and not a sub-point. An example of a transition

sentence with the main points “background” and “government” could read, “Knowledge of

Scotland’s diverse background will assist in understanding the structure of its government.” You

do not need to transition between the introduction paragraph and main point one, or from the

final main point to the conclusion paragraph; only use transition sentences between each main

point.

Conclusion – Tell them what you told them.

Now that you have communicated all the pertinent information about the topic in the body, you

move to the conclusion paragraph and tell them what you told them.

The summary is the reverse of the overview from the introduction where you re-cover the main

points. Do not provide any additional information on the main points, just state or list what they

were. The summary should only be one sentence.

The re-motivation statement should highlight the importance or value of the brief or paper. In

the introduction paragraph, you gave the listener/reader a WIIFM; the re-motivation statement

should tie back into the original WIIFM. The re-motivation should only be one sentence.

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The closing should consist of either, a thought provoking idea (in reference to your overall

topic), or a quote from someone of importance or expertise that supports the information outlined

in the speech/paper. Its purpose is to give the audience a thought or challenge that will keep

them thinking about your topic long after you are done, making them want more information, or

making them agree with your overall ideas. The closing should be one or two sentences.

Outline

When developing your brief or paper you should first develop an outline. The bottom line is the

outline comes before the brief or paper, not the other way around.

Enclosure 1 is the outline format used at the Senior Enlisted Academy. Enclosure 2 is a sample

outline of a presentation that has two main points. If the assignment requires additional main

points, just remember to provide a transition sentence in between each new main point. This

example has sub-points under each main point. These are not required, but can help as you

further organize your thoughts and ideas. Do not include transitions between sub-points and

ensure that your transitions flow from main point to main point, not from a final sub-point to the

next main point.

The importance of effective communications cannot be stressed enough. To be an effective

communicator, you must be able to present ideas in a clear and concise manner.

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Three Part Outline

INFORMATION: The three-part outline is the basic framework for effective communication.

I. Introduction

A. Attention Getter:

B. Motivation:

C. Overview:

II. Main Body

A. Main Point 1:

1. Sub-point (listing sub-points is optional)

2. Sub-point

Transition Sentence 1:

B. Main Point 2:

1. Sub-point (listing sub-points is optional)

2. Sub-point

III. Conclusion

A. Summary:

B. Re-motivation:

C. Closing:

Enclosure 1 (HO 2-02-1)

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Government Credit Card Abuse

I. Introduction

A. Attention Getter: Each service member spends one hour of Government Travel Charge

Card (GTCC) training each year amounting to 1.5 million manhours throughout the

Armed Forces. With so much training, how are cases of GTCC misuse still on the rise?

B. Motivation: Senior Leaders must ensure their service members follow GTCC guidelines in

order to prevent wasted manhours on additional training, thus increasing a more

productive work environment.

C. Overview: This essay will discuss the background of a GTCC misuse case and the

resulting impact from the member’s actions.

II. Main Body

A. Main Point 1: Background

1. Senior NCO purchases items with GTCC unrelated to official travel.

2. Member mandated to reimburse the government; retired shorty after.

Transition Sentence 1: Understanding the background leads to the potential impact in the

workplace created by this NCO’s behavior.

B. Main Point 2: Impact

1. NCO’s unethical behavior gives other NCOs a bad name; travel claims are scrutinized

causing the command to have a bad rep.

2. The entire work center must go through GTCC training again resulting in hours

focused on training and not on taskers/mission.

3. NCO is relieved of his collateral duties, now new personnel must be trained.

4. Good order and discipline/morale decrease; members show regression or have

minimum desire to engage in work center “fun” activities.

III. Conclusion

A. Summary: This essay covered the background of a GTCC misuse case and the resulting

impact from the member’s actions.

B. Re-motivation: Senior Leaders must ensure their service members follow GTCC

guidelines in order to prevent wasted manhours on additional training, thus increasing a

more productive work environment.

C. Closing: If a member wouldn’t buy certain items with a personal credit card, then why

engage in unethical behavior that results in additional money spent and embarrassment in

front of peers?

Enclosure 2 (HO 2-06-6)

The post Communication is the process of people sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings with each other in commonly understandable ways. appeared first on Versed Writers.

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