action research design slp

The Doctoral Study

Module 1 described in detail how the SLP for this course will produce a document that will begin a working draft of a proposal for your Doctoral Study. Once again, it is important that you not be concerned that the work you do at this early date will obligate you to that topic later on. Your thinking should and will evolve as you take additional courses. However, you should take this assignment and the feedback you receive seriously because it will serve as the template you will follow as you develop your ideas more fully. We continue the SLP series for this course with the Module 3 SLP deliverable.

Module 3: How would I classify the appropriate study design (explanatory, descriptive, etc.)? Describe how you would classify your design and explain the rationale for your design choice. Briefly discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the approach. (2-3 pages)

SLP Assignment Expectations

Although the SLP is a less formal document than a case study, it is expected that you follow APA convention at the doctoral level. Also, although you are asked for your opinion, remember that it is good practice to avoid writing in the first person. Instead, focus on stating the facts as you perceive them to be while writing in the third person—and cite supporting sources.

Action research design Background Info

Action research is defined as applied research that focuses on solving practitioner problems (Johnson & Christensen, 2012). The term “action” within action research implies both the collection and evaluation data as well as undertaking specific initiatives—that is “doing something” in order to solve a specific problem, improve a process, or address a deficiency. Action research therefore follows a cycle of plan-act-reflect that is often repeated multiple times in order to converge on sound and workable findings. Although action research is similar to change management in its structured approach to change, action research is distinctive in its focus on reflection and evaluation of the collected data that emerges from the taken action. Further, action research is an iterative process. The results of the plan-act-reflect cycle are used to engage in further action (Dick, 2014). The intense reflection that takes place in action research could be compared to the successive stages of evaluation observed in root cause analysis. In the field of business, it is essential that the practitioner “solves the right problem”. Reflection on the results helps ensure that this happens.

If you noticed that the plan-act-observe-reflect cycle mirrors the Deming plan-do-check-act cycle, you would be right. There are similarities between these structured, common-sense steps associated with arriving at the fundamental nature of the problem. However, action research is grounded in the “appreciative enquiry” cycle that emphasizes a holistic depth of understanding that goes beyond surface analysis of empirical data (Coates, 2005).

The participatory element of action research also finds common ground with change management and case study research. The researcher is a participant in the actions taken and in the reflection on the collected data. As such, an action researcher may act as a change agent. This characteristic of action research makes it ideal for business practitioners who intend to embark on a career in consulting.

The plan

Successful action research begins with a plan. The plan outlines the overall strategy for how the research will be carried out. Further, since action research initiates action based on findings—the design of the overall research is closely linked and nearly synonymous with the action research plan. Finally, the plan may be iterative in nature, so the design of the research must take this into account.

Often, the difficulty for the researcher is knowing where to begin. A suggestion is to follow a checklist that helps clarify the nature of the problem within the research setting (typically an organization), initial assumptions going into the study, how the data might be collected (and in what form), and finally, any rough idea of what possible solutions may look like. Sample questions for the researcher to consider are:

  1. What is the nature of the problem that is proposed to be investigated?
  2. What is the scope of the problem, and who are the players (i.e., stakeholders) that have an interest in the outcome of the research?
  3. What are some preliminary options for collecting data?
  4. How is the collected data to be evaluated?
  5. How will the results of the data collection be applied to a change/improvement initiative?
  6. How will I know if the problem has been addressed—and what data do I need in order to determine this? (Ferrance, N.D.)

Since the design of the research and the overall plan are essential elements of action research, the case assignment for Module 3 will provide an opportunity to conceive of and design a simply high-level action research plan.

Coates, M. (2005). Action Research A Guide for Associate Lecturers. Retrieved November 27, 2016, from http://www.open.ac.uk/cobe/docs/AR-Guide-final.pdf . Center for Outcomes Based Education

Dick, B. (2014, December 30). Action research and evaluation on line (web). Retrieved November 27, 2016, from http://www.aral.com.au/areol/areolind.html (Read “Session 1 and Session 2” links)

Ferrance, E. (n.d.). Action Research: Themes in Education. Retrieved November 27, 2016, from https://www.brown.edu/academics/education-alliance…

Johnson, B. & Christensen, L. (2012). Educational research: Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed approaches. (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc.

Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). Qualitative data analysis: An expanded sourcebook. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Action research readings

The following readings are required for module three. Optional readings can be found at the end of each section and while not required, may help you understand the material better and be useful to you if you choose to conduct the action research method for your doctoral study. All readings can be accessed in the Trident Online library, unless linked to another source.

Coates, M. (2005). Action Research A Guide for Associate Lecturers. Retrieved November 27, 2016, from http://www.open.ac.uk/cobe/docs/AR-Guide-final.pdf . Center for Outcomes Based Education

Dick, B. (2014, December 30). Action research and evaluation on line (web). Retrieved November 27, 2016, from http://www.aral.com.au/areol/areolind.html (Read “Session 1 and Session 2” links)

Sankaran, S. and Hou, T.B. (N.D.) Action Research Models in Business Research pp8-12 http://anzsys.org/anzsys03/ran3000072_3.pdf

Perry, C., & Zuber-Skerritt, O. (1992). Action Research in Graduate Management Research Programs. Higher Education, 23(2), 195-208.

Centre for Lifelong Learning. (n.d.). Retrieved November 27, 2016, from https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/study/cll/courses/professionaldevelopment/wmcett/

Ferrance, E. (n.d.). Action Research: Themes in Education. Retrieved November 27, 2016, from https://www.brown.edu/academics/education-alliance…

Optional Reading

Participatory Action Research: Theory and Methods for Engaged Inquiry. Apr 20, 2013 by Jacques M. Chevalier and Daniel J. Buckles

Participatory Action Research (Qualitative Research Methods). Nov 28, 2007 by Alice McIntyre

The Action Research Planner: Doing Critical Participatory Action Research. Nov 12, 2013 by Stephen Kemmis and Robin McTaggart

Stringer, E. (2007). Action Research (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.

Stringer, E. (2013). Action Research (4th ed.). Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.

Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). Qualitative data analysis: An expanded sourcebook. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

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